Prince George to Vancouver

Ok, it’s catch up time. I want to share the journey from Prince George to Vancouver, which happened over a week ago- but feels like months ago because the last two weeks have been cram happy busy! Days after returning home my daughter drove out from Kimberley, bringing rug-nuts Dexter and Jackson in tow, to visit for the week and it was a packed week. She left for home on the 6 am ferry today (which meant getting up at 4:30) and I have just enough time – two days- to blast clean through the house, visit my mom, and prepare for my Brother-in-Law’s ten day visit from Ontario. Hot on his heels – three days in fact- of his departure two more relatives are coming in also from Ontario to spend ten days with us, and I look forward to showing them all around Vancouver Island!

So having nearly gut cleaned my house all day today, after being away nearly a month in Kimberley then off to Prince George, then my daughter’s visit who had time or desire to really clean?  This is my window to sit and collect the events over the last couple of weeks and take a deep breath.

Wait, I’m gonna make some tea first.

Ok, Prince George, Fort George, named after King George, was a fur trading settlement, now it has three pulp mills. Air quality is an issue, although the two times I’ve been the air was clear, so I don’t know. Its magnificence may lie in that it is situated where the Nechako River meets the mighty Fraser River and there are some excellent sites of the rivers in easy access from town. We were only there for two days and I got out for a drive up the hill to the University to get some good sites of the lay out of the city and managed to get a few good photographs. You can see one of the mills in the distance. But look how clear the air is! Then I spent the afternoon down at Cottonwood Park and the Nechako where gorgeous walking trails follow the banks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leaving P.G we decided to take the Duffey Lake Road to Squamish, a far superior scenic drive that follows a small river, and past Seton Lake with great camping all along the way. The photographs that follow are taken along the Duffey and into Squamish then ending in Vancouver. We stopped and stayed a night in Vancouver to see our son and his band play at the yacht club to promote their new EP, then caught the B.C. Ferry home the next morning. Even the ferry home is like a mini cruise and seeing my little island rise up as we close in on Departure Bay is always a warm welcome. I love where I live!

Foothills near Lilloet B.C.

 

Lilloet B.C. on the Fraser River

 

Seton Lake

 

Last years land slide on the Duffey Road.

 

The old Chief Mountain in Squamish B.C.

 

Kite surfing in Squamish B.C.

 

 

Vancouver False Creek, Granville Island (which isn’t really an island) from the Granville Street bridge

 

 

Granville Island Vancouver, from the Granville Street bridge

 

English Bay from the Granville Street Bridge, Vancouver, B.C.

 

Ferry Home

Then there’s Hope

I left with Bob on the 12:30 Ferry from Departure Bay to Horseshoe Bay and driving through the lower mainland of Vancouver on Hwy 1 we made for Hope. One of the little but not so insignificant considerations of driving the Hwy 1 or Trans- Canada from Horseshoe Bay through the city is the absence of any, nil, zero, traffic lights all the way for 170 km. It’s a smooth long flow right on through Chilliwack, Abbotsford and on to Hope, well actually, to the opposite end of the country if you kept on going, the Trans-Can is one of the longest uninterrupted highways in the world.

Bob has a few days of work in Prince George and I’m taking the opportunity to go along for this mini tour. Again, fun for me, poor Bob has made this trek countless times over thirty-five years of working Pulp Mill Shut-Downs, saying he knows every stump and stone all along the way. I contemplated testing him. Naw, I’ll take his word.

Ok, so anyway back to Hope. This is the first and only stop over on the little leg of our journey on our way  to Prince George, the second largest city in B.C. in the centre of the Province, a good 7 1/2 hour drive from Hope. In his robust younger days Bob would do the drive from Vancouver Island to P. G. in one go, but really that’s just madness, which makes me question exactly how many stumps and stones would one could actually see driving like a dirt devil for twelve hours? (Total of 15 hours when you include waiting for the ferry and riding the ferry before even starting the drive!) Ferry travel- another post.

We’ve stopped in Hope on previous road trips for gas or a snack on the way to somewhere else and the first time years ago, staying a night in a motel just off the highway, left me somewhat uncomfortable in the place. I mean the massively tall fir-tree covered mountains are RIGHT THERE looming over you, or in the case of that motel, directly behind and above; which caused me to wonder if it came by the name of Hope from pioneer gold miners murmuring a prayer, I HOPE THIS MOUNTAIN DOESN’T FALL ON MY HEAD. Probably not, but that’s what I would (no, I do) say.  It’s obvious I don’t enjoy closed in surroundings like in the crevices and canyons of towering rock. Foothills, distant rocky mountain ranges, oceans, meadows, wide valleys, deserts and prairie are more my element.

So to be fair I actually only visited the town of Hope twice, last month on our way to Kimberley and now, because these times we went INTO the town. And it is pretty. And yes, the Looming presence is there, but in town its threat feels slightly benign instead, maybe spectacular. Impressive also is the Fraser River running through the town, one of the longest rivers in Canada, with humble beginnings in Northern B.C.’s Fraser Pass building and running down into Vancouver’s Delta and New Westminster region and into the Strait of Georgia on the Pacific.

We got a room at the Windsor right downtown for $100, our last stay in Hope was at the Skagit Motel down the street from the Windsor which we liked better, and went for a walk through the neighborhood before having dinner at Wallace, good restaurant by the way.

10,000 years previous this region was the home of the Sto:lo first nations until 1782 when, like all the other European contact tragedies, small pox wiped out over two-thirds of their populations within six weeks. Below is the Dream Totem. Life must have been quite glorious and richly abundant here for them along this big waterway.

Hope also holds the oldest church on its original foundation in British Columbia, the Christ Church consecrated in 1861. The cedar trees that surround the church are magnificently huge, in fact the downtown has kept many of the old growth occupants intact, flanking the pathways to houses or lining a bit of the street and through the small park in the town centre, like acknowledging them as part of the residential population, a rightly place in the neighborhood.

On a bit of ground to the side of the little church is a Labyrinth, which of course I had to walk, because I have never waked one before. I can appreciate the meditative aspects of this exercise but I’m not sure I talked to God though. Maybe next time.

Next morning we grabbed breakfast at the Blue Moose across the street and began the long drive to the middle of B.C.

 

 

David and Goliath

We got out on our first little sail of the summer the other day, the winds were light but steady and the sun had finally burned away most of the clouds. We didn’t venture far, just around Snake Island four miles out due to the light air. We were kept company by a couple of these big fellas waiting at anchor to get into Vancouver’s port across the Strait.

They are a bane to some of the residents here, hearing the rumbling as they let out their chain rode to drop heavy anchors, complaining of their noisy generators running during the night, and their sometimes bright lights, especially if they anchor particularly close to our island, but I’m fascinated by their  scale, the engineering of their structure, and the historical connection they carry.

Moving cargo by sea is ancient, the world’s economy has hinged on floating vessels up and down great river and ocean systems for millennia. I don’t want to comment necessarily on the cargo they now transport other than to say besides the many loads of sneakers, import cars, stuff for the Wal-Mart’s, or raw log exports – lets face it we buy all this stuff, no right to judge what is necessary goods; there is perhaps much more that is down right dangerous like the diluted  toxic Bitumen that will be coming through the pipeline from the Alberta tar sand’s channeled through B.C.’s mountain range and pristine wilderness for freighter export out of Vancouver’s busy harbour.  Odds are certain this big red ship from Majuro will have such cargo.

It’s the paradox of human ingenuity, we can create incredible feats of engineering that by the same token can harm or destroy. The double edge sword that’s hidden in our many revered works. The Pyramids or the great wall of China can inspire and we marvel and congratulate our innovations, but the lives of thousands of slaves that severely toiled and perished seem to escape us.

And while these ships are striking to see up close, their tenuous journey out to the open pacific before first threading through our narrow passages and skirting our active gulf islands causes some amount of disdain.   But what can we do? We are hypocrites all.

 

 

 

Back home

I’ve been home for two weeks now after spending the month of May in Kimberley visiting my daughter while Bob was working in the area, and I’ve been so busy I haven’t put time aside to post. Upon our return we were greeted with a lawn of very tall grass, and because it was already the end of May we had to get busy buying seeds and vegetable starts and flowers, getting the vegetable gardens planted, putting flower baskets together, mowing and weeding.

We did have a little parcel we discovered in our hedge while weeding, a nest of twelve quail eggs. The mother must’ve been out feeding when we saw the pale and brown speckled eggs nestled in the tall grass. When I checked them the next day I thought they were gone, that a raccoon had gotten to them, but then I looked again I could then notice the excellent camouflage of the male parent spread out over the nest.

I also needed to get up to see my Mom for some serious breakout time; I take her out about three times a week, taking her for lunch, drives, and walks down at the beach front. Although my sister got her out on the weekends while I was away, mom was getting a bit of cabin fever being cloistered during the weeks.

Yesterday Bob and I worked hard in pulling up a massive bamboo type ground cover that had gotten away on us and was encroaching on the veg garden area, and today- I’m beat! Coupled with staying up too late last night to try to watch Saturday Night Live and then waking at 6 this morning, I can never sleep in no matter how late I go to bed! I feel like a wet rag today~

So after doing a bit of raking I’ve surrendered to the remainder of the day to give it a rest. Find a comfy spot in the sun maybe and read. I do need a trip to the library, having finished Paradise by Toni Morrison while in Kimberley, I’ll see what I can re-read from my own library ~

Taking a walk

I now have to bombard everyone with a series of photographs of areas where I’ve been on daily walks with the rugnuts. As mentioned in the previous post Kimberley is replete with hiking avenues for every level of adventurer, and the views are gorgeously absorbing.

 

The unpaved Volksmarch trail, about 2 kilometers in length, follows along side the 28 kilometer paved Northstar rail2trail below.

The ridge trail above the town of Marysville that links up to the Volksmarch trail and to the NorthStar trail. This is where I come to walk most days because it is open and sunny, easy access, great views and it gets in a good length of a walk.

 

 

The Northstar Rail to Trail though is a fantastic path for a good long walk or bike ride, which my daughter and I did last year. It will take you all the way in to Cranbrook 28 kilometers away. The hounds and I spent a better part of the day on it starting from Marysville. And like I mentioned the entire area is gorgeous!